The Difference Between Stock and Broth

Stock and broth are different, very different.

Broths are seasoned and imply meat scraps that are boiled with vegetables – a simple mirepoix, the holy onion, carrot, celery trinity – to produce a flavorful liquid.

A stock on the other hand is left purposefully neutral in taste, devoid of seasoning and overly intense flavor. Instead a great stock is more of an essence, like a glimpse of a singular flavor profile. A stock needs a true mirepoix (2 part onion, 1 part carrot, and celery) and only roasted bones.Stocks

Don’t get me wrong, broths are great on their own. An ideal soup if you will, meanwhile stocks impart foundational taste and aroma into food they are added to.

Broths and stocks are both highly valuable in professional kitchens. In fact most kitchens in New York produce their own stocks and flavorful broths from scratch on a daily basis. Utilizing viable but inedible trim and scraps is simply how restaurants stay in business. It’s not the most exciting job in the kitchen but without it, restaurants are paralyzed.

A rich stock will add intense body to basmati rice or an ancient grain like farro; a full-bodied broth will beautifully round any hearty soup or purée garnish.No matter the application these liquids are essential in cooking. Try this simple Chicken Stock Recipe and you too will elevate your meals in no time.

 

 

Chicken Stock            
1000g             Chicken (Leg/Thigh, Breast, and/or Bones/Wings)
500g              Onion
250g              Celery
250g              Carrot
  50g              Parsley Stems
  10g              Thyme
  10g              Clove Garlic
     1t            Black Peppercorn
 ~_g             Cold Water (as much needed to fill ingredients)
  1. Fill large stock pot with ingredients.
  2. Cover entirely with cold water.
  3. Bring to a boil.
  4. Once rolling, let simmer at medium-low heat for 5 hours.
  5. Strain with cheesecloth and freeze (shelf life frozen up to 4 months).

 

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